Our Logo

Finance Software

Home

Financial Software

Financial Advice

Links

About Us

Contact Us

Site Map

News

Financial Advice
Credit Report
Financial Freedom
Financial Planning
Help Tax
Help With Investing
Identity Theft
Financial Software
Accounting Software
Bookkeeping
Quicken
Tax Software
Investing Software
Historical stock Quotes
Portfolio tracker
Stock market chart
Stock market tools
Stock picking software
Personal Financial Software
Debt management solution
Home financial software
Personal budget software
Real Estate Software
Buying home
Foreclosure listing
Real estate analysis
Real estate development
Real estate management
Realtor software
Selling property
Home
Links
About Us
Contact Us
Site Map
News

Identity Theft – Beware of Phishing Attacks!

Author: Charles Essmeier

“Dear Bank of the West customer”, the message begins. I’ve just received an e-mail message, purportedly from the security department at the Bank of the West. The message explains that certain features of my account have been suspended due to “suspicious activity” on my account. The message then provides a link that I can follow in order to fill out an online form confirming my identity. It’s certainly nice that Bank of the West is worried about the status of my account. There’s just one problem – I don’t have an account at Bank of the West. In fact, I’ve never even heard of Bank of the West.

his message is an example of “phishing”, a relatively new problem found on the Internet. Unscrupulous individuals are sending spam e-mail messages by the millions, purporting to be from credit card companies, PayPal, eBay, or banks. Each message warns the recipient of questionable activity on his or her account, as asks that the recipient click on a link to verify personal information. The requested information is usually a username or password. Sometimes it’s a credit card number and expiration date. These messages are almost always fraudulent, and consumers are falling for them by the thousands. The messages certainly look legitimate, and often mimic the style of the legitimate company’s messages exactly. How can you tell the difference between a real message from your bank and a fake one designed to steal your identity?

There are several tips to help identify phishing expeditions. The first is the greeting. “Dear valued customer” is an odd greeting from a company that has a database that contains your name, address, Social Security number and credit card. Any company with whom you do business that legitimately wants to contact you will probably do so by name. Look for misspelled words. Phishing expeditions often come from foreign senders who often mangle the English text of the message rather badly, combining both bad grammar and bad spelling. Check the links in the messages. The link may say www.eBay.com, but if you move your mouse over the link, you may see something like “htttp://200.118.105…” on the bottom line of your e-mail program, indicating that the link is a fake. Should you click on the link, you’ll be taken to a page that looks just like the real Website, but why take the chance?

If you need to contact your bank, credit card company, or online auction house, either go to their Website directly or call them. Never click on a link in a message that threatens you with account suspension; if a company with whom you do business has issues with your account, they will probably contact you by phone or mail. These individuals who use these phishing tips are getting more clever all the time. It pays to be suspicious. If you aren’t, you may end up a victim of identity theft.

©Copyright 2005 by Retro Marketing. Charles Essmeier is the owner of Retro Marketing, a firm devoted to informational Websites, including End-Your-Debt.com, a site devoted to debt consolidation and credit counseling, and HomeEquityHelp.com, a site devoted to information regarding mortgages and home equity lending .

See Also: Identity Theft, Financial Advice, Financial Software



Think Outside the BLOCK! - TaxBrain.com
Click Here For The Wall Street Journal
Daily Deals at FranklinCovey.com


IQ Charts
Home About us Links Site Map News
Free Financial Advice Accounting Software Personal Financial Software Investing Software Real Estate Software
Copyright 2009 - All Rights Reserved